BBI-TAITE Units

All Directed studies, Capstone Units and IMER900 will be offered in all sessions as required by students.

Click here to see the 2 year Unit Rotation.

For Session 2, 2024 Dates, click here.

Units

2024 Availability

T9294 (THEO902)

Major Independent Guided Study in Theological Studies (18cps)

Curriculum Objectives

This graduate course unit provides students with demonstrated initiative and creativity an opportunity to produce an extended piece of individual research at an advanced level on a particular area of study. It may be on a topic that has arisen from a standard unit or on a topic that is not available elsewhere in the curriculum. The unit is designed to refine the skills of independent study by allowing the student to define their own study and to set their own goals by means of an extended guided reading program.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • develop a focused topic for independent scholarly investigation
  • conduct independent research, under supervision, in terms of locating, utilising and referencing a wide range of appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • analyse and evaluate with critical empathy a range of disparate scholarly positions
  • defend an independent perspective on the topic of the investigation, and
  • produce a cogent set of researched findings in an extended piece of academic writing.

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106, B8101 & T9210

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures
  • At least three hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Lecturer

Dr Charles Waddell

Teaching methods

Online lectures; one-to-one supervision.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

B9249 (THEO910)

Kings, Priests and Prophets: Leadership in the Hebrew Bible

Unit overview and content

This unit provides the opportunity for students to study the background and literature of the Hebrew Bible, commonly referred to as the Old Testament, at an advanced level with a particular focus on the theme of leadership. The unit utilises the tools of Biblical scholarship to study in detail the concepts of priests and the associated sacrificial system, the rise and fall of the monarchy, and the place of prophets in the Hebrew Bible.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate an advanced knowledge of key features of the historical, cultural and religious background of the Law and Prophets sections in the Hebrew Bible
  • appreciate the books of the Law and the Prophets as literary and theological expressions of Israel’s history and experience
  • critically analyse the concepts of priests, sacrifices and worship, kings and prophets, with close reference to relevant texts from the Hebrew
  • review and critically evaluate the theme of leadership in the Hebrew Bible, and
  • apply a critical exegetical method to selected passages from the Law or Prophets at an advanced level, and apply the interpretation in a modern context.

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106 and B8101

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures.
  • At least three hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

B9253 (THEO911)

Interpreting the Four Gospels

Unit overview and content

This course unit builds upon the knowledge and skills learned in the pre-requisite biblical studies. It critically examines the historical context, structure, literary forms and theological content of the four gospels of the New Testament as well as their application to Christian worship, teaching and spirituality. As an Advanced Elective unit, this unit builds on critical skills formed in pre-requisite study.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • analyse the impact that the historical, socio-cultural and religious background of the New Testament period had on the development of each of the four gospels
  • analyse and interpret the principal literary forms and theological themes of the four gospels of the New Testament
  • exegete selected passages from the four gospels using an accepted methodology
  • integrate secondary recent scholarship into the critical study and interpretation of the four gospels, and
  • apply insights gained from the critical study of the four gospels to contemporary Christian preaching, teaching and spirituality

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106 and B8101

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures.
  • At least three hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Lecturer

Dr Jonathan Thambyrajah

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

B9200 (THEO914)

The Great Narratives of the Bible

Curriculum Objectives

This unit introduces students to the most prominent Biblical Narratives, their nature, and the tools used to study them. Next, students will interpret them in light of their original historical and literary context. Finally, students will critically review the use and re-use of these narratives in ancient and modern interpretation, and apply them in a contemporary context.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • analyse critically key Biblical texts as narratives
  • contextualise Biblical narratives according to historical and literary factors
  • review and evaluate critically ancient and modern interpretations of Biblical narratives
  • reflect on and articulate the contemporary and personal relevance of Biblical narratives, and
  • apply Biblical narratives for a contemporary audience.

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106 & B8101

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures.
  • At least three hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Lecturer

Dr Jonathan Thambyrajah

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

 

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

B9293 (THEO919)

Minor Independent Guided Study (Biblical Studies)

Curriculum Objectives

This graduate course unit provides students with demonstrated initiative and creativity an opportunity to focus at an advanced level on a particular area of Biblical Studies under the tutelage and guidance of a specialist in the field. The unit is designed to refine the skills of independent study by allowing the student to define their own study, and to set their own goals by means of an extended guided reading program.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • develop a focused topic for independent scholarly investigation
  • conduct independent research, under supervision, in terms of locating, utilising and referencing a wide range of appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • analyse and evaluate with critical empathy a range of disparate scholarly positions
  • defend an independent perspective on the topic of the investigation, and
  • produce a cogent set of researched findings in an extended piece of academic writing.

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106, B8101, and one of B9249 or B9253

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least 10 hour per week of directed study, including reading, research, consultation with tutor and writing up of assessment tasks.

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

T9218 (THEO921)

Church: The Living Community of Faith

Unit overview and content

This course is an advanced study of ecclesiology. Ecclesiology is a sub-discipline of systematic theology which emerged during the late 19th and 20th centuries. Ecclesiology is a systematic study of the nature and mission of the Church. The unit will consider factors which contributed to the development of this discipline and examine key theologians and ecclesiologies. The unit will examine a variety of historical and contemporary theological understandings of the Christian Church, with an emphasis on the ecclesiology of communion emerging from Vatican II.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • explain and interpret the theological foundations, nature and mission of the Church, and their application
  • synthesise the ways the Church has unfolded from New Testament times to today
  • analyse critically the Church’s ecumenical and interfaith relationships and possibilities, and
  • reflect on and evaluate the challenges and opportunities facing the contemporary Church, particularly in Australia.

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106 and B8101

Study hours

11 hours per week for 11 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures.
  • At least four hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Lecturer

Rev Dr Charles Waddell

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

T9262 (THEO924)

Ecological Theology

Unit overview and content

This unit provides students with an opportunity to discover the relevance of theology in the context of the present ecological and climate crises. It introduces students to an ecologically sensitive reading of the Bible and interpretation of the theology of creation. Building on these, students will explore insights from ecology, (eco)feminist theology, Australian Aboriginal cosmology, and liberation theology to form an ecologically aware understanding of the relationships between the Triune God, the world as God’s creation, and humanity. Drawing, among others, on Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si’, students will gain an understanding of the ethical, liturgical, spiritual, and other practical dimensions of a Christian response to the ecological crisis.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • Critically appreciate the theology of creation in light of the ecological crisis
  • Articulate for a general audience foundational concepts in ecological theology
  • Evaluate the ethical, liturgical and justice dimensions of a Christian response to the ecological crisis
  • Articulate and appraise the contribution of the theology of integral ecology to Christian faith and praxis
  • Appreciate and communicate the moral, spiritual and practical implications of ecological conversion

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106 and B8101

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures.
  • At least three hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Lecturer

Professor Gerard Moore

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

T9293 (THEO929)

Minor Independent Guided Study (Theological Studies)

Curriculum Objectives

This graduate course unit provides students with demonstrated initiative and creativity an opportunity to focus at an advanced level in a particular area of Theological Studies, under the tutelage and guidance of a specialist in the field. The unit is designed to refine the skills of independent study by allowing the student to define their own study, and to set their own goals by means of an extended guided reading program.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • develop a focused topic for independent scholarly investigation
  • conduct independent research, under supervision, in terms of locating, utilizing and referencing a wide range of appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • analyse and evaluate with critical empathy a range of disparate scholarly positions
  • defend an independent perspective on the topic of the investigation, and
  • produce a cogent set of researched findings in an extended piece of academic writing

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106, B8101 & T9210

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least 10 hour per week of directed study, including reading, research, consultation with tutor and writing up of assessment tasks.

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

T9231 (THEO932)

Theology of the Sacraments

Unit overview and content

This unit presents a foundational study of the theology and rites of the sacraments with a focus on those of Roman Catholicism. It enables students to draw on their skills in the disciplines of theology and biblical studies to critically investigate the various components and approaches in sacramental theology including exploration of semiotics, and anthropological, Christological, ecclesiological dimensions. Students will have the opportunity to explore the implications of sacramental-liturgical theology as the source of Christian spirituality and mission.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • compare and evaluate two different sacramental/liturgical traditions and their theological basis
  • analyse the biblical and liturgical sources that have given rise to contemporary theology of the sacraments
  • engage critically with a wide range of scholarly theological/liturgical literature on the sacraments
  • apply to individual sacraments, in a critically informed way, the insights of recent proposals for a general sacramental paradigm, and
  • produce graduate-level research focused on the pastoral practice of one Christian sacrament

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106 & B8101

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least one hour per week for online lectures.
  • At least three hours per week of reading.
  • At least six hours per week of directed study, including optional and assessable online activities.

Lecturer

Prof Gerard Moore

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3

L9293 (THEO939)

Minor Independent Guided Study (Liturgy)

Curriculum Objectives

This graduate course unit provides students with demonstrated initiative and creativity an opportunity to focus at an advanced level in a particular area of Liturgy, under the tutelage and guidance of a specialist in the field. The unit is designed to refine the skills of independent study by allowing the student to define their own study, and to set their own goals by means of an extended guided reading program.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to:

  • develop a focused topic for independent scholarly investigation
  • conduct independent research, under supervision, in terms of locating, utilizing and referencing a wide range of appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • analyse and evaluate with critical empathy a range of disparate scholarly positions
  • defend an independent perspective on the topic of the investigation, and
  • produce a cogent set of researched findings in an extended piece of academic writing

Assumed Knowledge 

T8106, B8101 & T9210

Study hours

10 hours per week for 12 week session, comprised of:

  • At least 10 hour per week of directed study, including reading, research, consultation with tutor and writing up of assessment tasks.

Coordinator

Professor Gerard Moore

Teaching methods

Online lectures; online activities; guided reading; scaffolded assessments; feedback on assessments.

Indicative Assessment

At the Institute we use a range of assessment tasks, including essays, research papers, online posts, critical reflections, projects and praxis exercises. Within a unit of study each set of assessment tasks is designed as an integral part of your learning experience. These tasks vary across units and programs. All assessment tasks are aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework level appropriate for graduate awards.

2024 Availability
S1
S2
S3